sunyoungyang

Image
sunyoungyang@arizona.edu
Phone
(520) 621-0632
Office
Learning Services Building 106
Yang, Sunyoung
Assistant Professor

Sunyoung Yang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of East Asian Studies. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Canada, and her B.A. and M.A. from the Department of Sociology, Yonsei University, South Korea. 

As a cultural anthropologist, she has conducted in-depth research on Internet development since 1999, specializing in South Korea. She is one of the founding members of the Haja Center (Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) run by the Seoul Metropolitan Government and Yonsei University. As a member of the Asia Pacific Networking Group (APNG), she organized the second and third Asia Pacific Next Generation Camp, holding the positions of chair and vice chair. She also has participated in the Internet Governance Forum as a member of the Internet Society.

Sunyoung's research and teaching interests concentrate on the influence of new media and digital technologies on society with a focus on youth, labor, and gender issues in Korea and East Asia. She is currently writing a book manuscript titled Internet Freaks: Online User Communities and Cultural Politics in South Korea which examines the interwoven processes between Internet development and political-economic and socio-cultural changes in South Korea through the formation of new subjectivities of Internet users. She is conducting research on the formation of digital society in the Asia Pacific region as her second book project titled Making the Future Meaningful: Asia Pacific, Youths, and New Technologies

Sunyoung also directs the Korean Studies program in the department and is a member of a university-wide collaborative and cross-disciplinary group forging exciting research agendas in the area of Technology-Enhanced Language Learning (TELL).

Her long-term goal is to conduct ongoing participant observations of and write the real-time history of digital technologies and beyond, including the Internet, artificial intelligence, and quantum computing. 

Currently Teaching

EAS 491 – Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Requires faculty member approval, preceptor application on file with department.

EAS 498H – Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.

KOR 391 – Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Requires faculty member approval, preceptor application on file with department.

KOR 391H – Honors Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.

KOR 491 – Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Requires faculty member approval, preceptor application on file with department.

KOR 491H – Honors Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.

EAS 491H – Honors Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.

KOR 352 – Class, Gender, and Family in Korea

This course aims to allow students to learn about Korea using the three focuses of class, gender, and family. Reading ethnographic literature will be a tool to understand how class, gender, and family have been formed in Korea. Korea has transformed from one of the world's poorest agriculturally based countries to a postindustrial country in a very short time period. More than 80% of the entire population redefined itself as middle class, which shows Korean people's strong desire for upward mobility. Family has played an important role in realizing upward mobility and forming a middle-class identity. The gender-division of labor based on the separation between public and private spheres has functioned as an effective system for fast economic development while deepening gender discrimination. Marginalization of women has resulted in the abnormal growth of the private sphere where an extremely competitive education system and real estate speculation have been formed as family strategies for upward mobility. The particularity of Korean modernity can be found in the process of the interwoven formation of class, gender, and family.