sojeongj

Image
sojeongj@arizona.edu
Office
Learning Services Building 101
Chun, Sojung
Instructor

Currently Teaching

KOR 101 – Elementary Korean I

This is the first of two half courses making up a full-year elementary level Korean course that is designed for learners of Korean with no previous (or very limited) knowledge of the language. The objective of the course is to help students to be active Korean language users who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in the 21st century. In order to do so, this course is designed around the five Cs: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. The course will be conducted using a communicative language teaching approach integrating all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - and the five Cs by utilizing the required textbook, workbook, and authentic materials.

This course will first introduce the Korean Alphabet Hangul as well as the sound system of standard Korean. It will focus on writing the Korean alphabet and reading basic words, phrases, and sentences correctly. The latter part of this course will focus on grammatical patterns such as basic sentence structures and word order, assuming that students have no previous (or very limited) knowledge of Korean. In addition, students will be exposed to everyday life situations likely to be encountered in contemporary Korean society.

This is the first of two half courses making up a full-year elementary level Korean course that is designed for learners of Korean with no previous (or very limited) knowledge of the language. The objective of the course is to help students to be active Korean language users who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in the 21st century. In order to do so, this course is designed around the five Cs: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. The course will be conducted using a communicative language teaching approach integrating all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - and the five Cs by utilizing the required textbook, workbook, and authentic materials.

This course will first introduce the Korean Alphabet Hangul as well as the sound system of standard Korean. It will focus on writing the Korean alphabet and reading basic words, phrases, and sentences correctly. The latter part of this course will focus on grammatical patterns such as basic sentence structures and word order, assuming that students have no previous (or very limited) knowledge of Korean. In addition, students will be exposed to everyday life situations likely to be encountered in contemporary Korean society.

This is the first of two half courses making up a full-year elementary level Korean course that is designed for learners of Korean with no previous (or very limited) knowledge of the language. The objective of the course is to help students to be active Korean language users who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in the 21st century. In order to do so, this course is designed around the five Cs: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. The course will be conducted using a communicative language teaching approach integrating all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - and the five Cs by utilizing the required textbook, workbook, and authentic materials.

This course will first introduce the Korean Alphabet Hangul as well as the sound system of standard Korean. It will focus on writing the Korean alphabet and reading basic words, phrases, and sentences correctly. The latter part of this course will focus on grammatical patterns such as basic sentence structures and word order, assuming that students have no previous (or very limited) knowledge of Korean. In addition, students will be exposed to everyday life situations likely to be encountered in contemporary Korean society.

This is the first of two half courses making up a full-year elementary level Korean course that is designed for learners of Korean with no previous (or very limited) knowledge of the language. The objective of the course is to help students to be active Korean language users who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in the 21st century. In order to do so, this course is designed around the five Cs: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. The course will be conducted using a communicative language teaching approach integrating all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - and the five Cs by utilizing the required textbook, workbook, and authentic materials.

This course will first introduce the Korean Alphabet Hangul as well as the sound system of standard Korean. It will focus on writing the Korean alphabet and reading basic words, phrases, and sentences correctly. The latter part of this course will focus on grammatical patterns such as basic sentence structures and word order, assuming that students have no previous (or very limited) knowledge of Korean. In addition, students will be exposed to everyday life situations likely to be encountered in contemporary Korean society.

KOR 201 – Intermediate Korean I

This course is the first part of the intermediate level Korean, and is designed for learners of Korean who have taken KOR 102, second part of Elementary Korean or had basic knowledge in Korean. The objective of the course is to help students to be active Korean language users who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in the 21st century. In order to do so, this course is designed around the five Cs, communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. The course will be conducted using a communicative language teaching approach integrating all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - and the five Cs by utilizing the required textbook, workbook, and authentic materials.

Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students will be exposed to everyday life contexts (e.g., language use, culture, etc.) likely to be encountered in contemporary Korean society.

KOR 301 – Third-Year Korean I

This is the first half of a third-year Korean course designed for students who have successfully completed KOR 202 or have an equivalent intermediate knowledge of Korean. The objective of the course is to facilitate fluency as students expand their knowledge of Korean and become active Korean language users who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in the 21st century. Utilizing the required textbook, workbook, and authentic materials with this aim in mind, this course is designed around the five Cs, communication, culture, connections, comparisons, and communities. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and the course will be conducted using a communicative language teaching approach integrating all four skill areas. It is expected that, by the end of the semester, students will be able to read and communicate fluently on a variety of topics relevant to Korean society.

KOR 391 – Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Requires faculty member approval, preceptor application on file with department.

KOR 391H – Honors Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.

KOR 491 – Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Requires faculty member approval, preceptor application on file with department.

KOR 491H – Honors Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.

EAS 391 – Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.

EAS 391H – Honors Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.

EAS 491 – Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Requires faculty member approval, preceptor application on file with department.

EAS 491H – Honors Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.

KOR 102 – Elementary Korean II

This is the second of two half courses making up a full-year elementary level Korean course is designed for learners of Korean with a very limited knowledge of the language. The course will be delivered using a communicative language approach to teaching all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, the five Cs (Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities) will be used to facilitate learning. By combining the contents of the textbooks and workbooks with carefully chosen authentic learning materials, this course will strive to assist students to be proactive in their learning of the Korean language.

This course will encompass six of the most common contexts that learners of Korean will encounter in daily life: The Weekend, In Seoul, Birthdays, At a Professor's Office, Living in a Dormitory, and Family. By exploring given dialogues along with related vocabulary and grammatical points, students will learn how they can interact with Korean speakers in each setting. Students will also be introduced to various cultural aspects such as National Holidays in Korea, How to Get Around in a Korean City, Age and Birthdays, Korean Music, Traditional Attire, and How to Address others in the Korean Hierarchical System. In addition, this course will provide students with an opportunity to practice different ways to conjugate verbs as well as to utilize casual connectives.