mcamp

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mcamp@arizona.edu
Office
Learning Services Building 116
Camp, Margaret
Associate Professor

Dr. Maggie Camp is an Associate Professor of Japanese Linguistics in East Asian Studies and an affiliated faculty member of the Center of East Asian Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and with the Institute for LGBT Studies. She received her BA in Japanese and Linguistics from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and her MA and PhD from the University of Arizona. She also studied at the Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama, Japan, and was a Fulbright Graduate Research Fellow at Keio University in Tokyo, Japan.  Dr. Camp’s research examines the relationship between gender and language in Japanese through the lens of sexuality, looking specifically at differences between the speech of Japanese lesbian and heterosexual women. Her current interests include sociolinguistics, sociophonetics, experimental phonetics, gender/sexuality, language ideology, and second language teaching and language use.

EAS 160A2 “Writing Systems of the World”

EAS160A5 “Languages and Cultures of East Asia”

JPN 245 “Japanese Popular Culture”

JPN 304 “Introduction to Japanese Linguistics” (cross-listed with Linguistics)

JPN 402/502 “Japanese Gender and Language” (cross-listed with Anthropology, Linguistics, Gender and Women’s Studies, and SLAT)

JPN 423/523 “Phonetics and Phonology of Japanese” (cross-listed with Linguistics and SLAT)

JPN 436/536 “Japanese Sociolinguistics” (cross-listed with Anthropology, Linguistics, and SLAT)

JPN 496c/596c “Topics in Japanese Linguistics” (cross-listed with Linguistics)

Currently Teaching

EAS 160A5 – Languages and Cultures of East Asia

This course will explore the social, historical, and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of East Asia and how they have changed over time, drawing from anthropology, linguistics, sociology, and history.

This course will explore the social, historical, and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of East Asia and how they have changed over time, drawing from anthropology, linguistics, sociology, and history.

This course will explore the social, historical, and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of East Asia and how they have changed over time, drawing from anthropology, linguistics, sociology, and history.

This course will explore the social, historical, and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of East Asia and how they have changed over time, drawing from anthropology, linguistics, sociology, and history.

This course will explore the social, historical, and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of East Asia and how they have changed over time, drawing from anthropology, linguistics, sociology, and history.

This course will explore the social, historical, and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of East Asia and how they have changed over time, drawing from anthropology, linguistics, sociology, and history.

EAS 498 – Senior Capstone

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive senior project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Student must be in last semester of Senior year to take the class.

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive senior project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Student must be in last semester of Senior year to take the class.

EAS 498H – Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.

JPN 304 – Introduction to Japanese Language and Linguistics

Sounds, words, grammar, change, writing, variation, and use of the Japanese language; provides basis for further study in the field.

JPN 245 – Japanese Popular Culture: Manga, Anime, and So Much More!

This course will explore contemporary Japanese society by investigating its colorful, dynamic, and rich output of visual culture. More specifically, we will look at manga, cinematic anime, and items of material culture, illustrating how these examples of popular art teach us about the various aspects of life in Japan.

This course will explore contemporary Japanese society by investigating its colorful, dynamic, and rich output of visual culture. More specifically, we will look at manga, cinematic anime, and items of material culture, illustrating how these examples of popular art teach us about the various aspects of life in Japan.

This course will explore contemporary Japanese society by investigating its colorful, dynamic, and rich output of visual culture. More specifically, we will look at manga, cinematic anime, and items of material culture, illustrating how these examples of popular art teach us about the various aspects of life in Japan.