Jiang Wu

Associate Professor, East Asian Studies
LSB 120
(520) 626-0171

jiangwu@email.arizona.edu

Chinese Religion

Teaches Chinese thought, religion and classical Chinese.

Dr. Jiang Wu is currently an associate professor in Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Arizona (Tucson). He received his Masters degree from Nankai University (1994) and Ph.D. from Harvard University (2002). His research interests include seventeenth-century Chinese Buddhism, especially Chan/Zen Buddhism, the role of Buddhist canons in the formation of East Asian Buddhist culture, and the historical exchanges between Chinese Buddhism and Japanese Buddhism. Other interests include Confucianism, Chinese intellectual history and social history, and the application of electronic cultural atlas tools in the study of Chinese culture and religion. He has published articles in Asia MajorJournal of East Asian HistoryJournal of Chinese Philosophy, and Monumenta Serica on a variety of topics. His first bookEnlightenment in Dispute: The Reinvention of Chan Buddhism in Seventeenth-century China has been published by Oxford University Press in 2008. Right now, he is conducting research on the formation of the Jiaxing canon in late imperial China and writing a biography of Yinyuan Longqi.

 

Recent Grants:

Recipient of 2014 Provost Author Support Fund for the Publication of “Leaving for the Rising Sun: Chinese Zen Master Yinyuan Longqi and the Authenticity Crisis in Early Modern East Asia.” (Forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2014)

 

Principle investigator, scholar grant from Chiang-ching Kuo Foundation for Cultural Exchanges for a book project entitled: “Leaving for the Rising Sun: Chinese Zen Master Yinyuan Longqi and the Authenticity Crisis in Early Modern East Asia.” (Forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2014)

 

Co-principal investigator, grant from International Center for Buddhist Studies at Renmin University for building a Research Lab for Spatial Analysis of Religion (SAR) at the University of Arizona.

 

Japan Foundation short-term fellowship for research in Kyoto during the summer of 2013, project title: “The Image of Edo Japan in Chinese Monks’ Travel Writings.”

 

Chief participant, National Science Foundation of China (NSFC) grant for “Buddhism and the Production of Social Space in Jiangnan during 1386–1949” for a period of four years (2013-2017)

 

Principal investigator, Confluence Center at the University of Arizona research grant for a project entitled “Analyzing Regional Religious Systems in China.” 2013-2014

 

Co-principal investigator, CCKF conference grant for the conference “The Chinese Buddhist Canon in the Age of Printing: An East Asian perspective,” held in March at University of the West, Los Angeles, March 18–20, 2013.