Courses

Introduction to modern spoken and written Chinese (Mandarin) for non-native speakers. Native speakers may not take this course.
  Introduction to modern spoken and written Chinese (Mandarin) for non-native speakers. Native speakers may not take this course.
Grammar, reading, and conversation in the modern (Mandarin) language for non-native speakers. Native speakers may not take this course.
Grammar, reading, and conversation in the modern (Mandarin) language for non-native speakers. Native speakers may not take this course.
This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese popular culture.  It explores popular culture's relations to social change, public spaces, the state, individual freedom, collective justice, national identity and globalization.
Introduces students to contemporary Chinese films and studies the role of cinema as historiography and ethnography.
Historical development of China from 750 A.D. to 1900 A.D.
Early poetry and classical prose.
Survey of major writers and genres in modern Chinese literature, with particular attention to the changing relationship between the writer and society.
This course explores the late imperial Chinese novel. It examines the variety of interpretive approaches used to understand the novel and considers issues of genre, intertextuality and the nature of reading. It also discusses the novel in the context of late imperial Chinese society and culture. All readings are in English
Advanced conversation, grammar, reading and writing in modern Chinese for non-native speakers. Native speakers may not take this course
Advanced conversation, grammar, reading and writing in Modern Chinese for non-native speakers. Native speakers may not take this course.
This course explores the wide diversity among the minority peoples in China.  It examines ethnic minority peoples' histories, cultures, and relationship to the Han majority and other minority populations.  It also discusses theories of ethnicity, nationalism and globalization.   (Graduate-level requirements include extra meeting per week; extra readings; longer papers with minimum source...
The course introduces students to the anthropological literature on contemporary China.  It examines various social and cultural aspects of everyday life such as family, body, sexuality, consumption, citizenship, urbanization, and property ownership. (Graduate-level requirements include an extra meeting per week; extra readings; longer and research papers with minimum source requirements.)  
Study of advanced modern (Mandarin) Chinese through readings in social science texts for non-native speakers. Native speakers may not take this course.
Study of advanced modern (Mandarin) Chinese through readings in modern literature. for non-native speakers. Native speakers may not take this course.
Linguistic study of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic systems of modern Chinese, with particular attention to linguistic analysis.
Introduction to pre-20th-century Chinese styles through readings in classical Chinese literature.  Graduate-level requirements include additional assignments relating to translation skill and research methodology.
Studies of Chinese American literature and film centered on the experience of immigration and Diaspora.
This course investigates social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of mass media and visual culture in China.  It examines various types of media, including print, mechanical, electronic, and digital media.  It focuses on major theoretical perspectives and models.  
Introduction to the theory and practice of English-to-Chinese and Chinese-to-English translations including study of the role of translation in China-West encounters and learning the craft of translation.
This course is designed for graduate and undergraduate students who are current or future Chinese language educators.  The objectives include: 1) Students will understand different teaching methods and their underlying philosophies, and be able to articulate his/her own philosophy of teaching; 2) Students will acquire a variety of techniques and design language classes using the expanded...
This course guides its students to understand the complex interaction between linguistic practices and social and cultural stratifications in the Sino-phone world (including Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Chinese diaspora communities in other parts of the world). It focuses on sociolinguistic aspects that are particularly salient in the Chinese context, such as language and...
Linguistic study of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic systems of modern Chinese, with particular attention to linguistic analysis.  Graduate-level requirements include two presentations and one term paper.
This course investigates social, cultural,economic, and political aspects of mas media and visual culture in China. It examines various types of media, including print, mechanical, electronic, and digital media. It focuses on major theoretical perspetives and models.  Graduate-level requirements include extra meeting per week; extra readings; longer papers with minimum requirements.
Advanced readings in Chinese poetic genres.
Introduction to the theory and practice of English-to-Chinese and Chinese-to-English translations including study of the role of translation in China-West encounters and learning the craft of translation.  Graduate-level requirements include much longer and more difficult assignments.  
Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Induvidual reasearch, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
The course surveys six religious traditions founded and developed in Asian including two from India: Hinduism and Buddhism, two from China: Confucianism and Taoism, and two from Japan: Shinto and Japanese New Religions. The survey of each religion includes: 1. a primary or sacred text, 2. contemporary practices in Asia, 3. contemporary practices in America, and 4. depictions in modern media. The...
An Introduction to Buddhism as both a religion and an array of cultural traditions, with emphasis on its various contributions to the formation of the South, Central, Southeast, and East Asian civilizations.   
Explores the nature of writing and the origin of the oldest known systems. Surveys the history and modern decipherment of ancient writing systems, and examines the variety of systems in use in the modern world.
Introduces you to traditional Chinese civilization for the purposes of this course defined as: "the totality of a culture's perception of itself and the world it occupies and the ways in which that self-perception is expressed in society, politics, religion, philosophy, and the arts." The content of the course is arranged in thematic units, each unit being placed in the context of a specific...
This course will explore the social, historical, and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of East Asia and how they have changed over time, drawing from anthropology, linguistics, sociology, and history
This course is designed to introduce students to the history, teachings, and practice of Zen Buddhism in China, Japan, Korea and the United States. The course will discuss Zen from a variety of perspectives but will center around the question of the meaning of history. Zen is a tradition of Buddhism that claims to have inherited and to pass on, in an unbroken historical transmission from...
  Introductory survey of recent histories of China, Japan and Korea, focusing on the major watersheds in these countries' modern experiences. The roles of indigenous culture and forces of change as well as foreign influences will be considered.  
The course examines multiple meanings of gender and sexuality among peoples in Asia. Topics include family and kinship; desire, affect and happiness; sexed bodies, femininity and masculinity; gender and sexual norms; political economy; queer cultural and political activisms and projects.
Major forms of Buddhist meditation from both the South Asian and East Asian traditions, with emphasis on the nature of meditation as a variety of religious experience.
Studies of major works and authors of fiction, drama, prose narrative and poetry in Asian American literature, in their relevant political, cultural and historical contexts.
Buddhism in China, Korea and Japan with emphasis on the relationship between East Asian Buddhist thought and practice and the various historical contexts in which they emerged.    Graduate-level requirements include assigned readings in primary Chinese or Japanese sources and in modern Chinese and/or Japanese secondary sources, together with a research paper based in part on such sources.
This course introduces its students to the social, cultural, and discursive aspects of language learning, teaching, and use. We begin by discussing the “social turn” in second language learning research. We then move to explore the social, cultural, and discursive factors that shape and condition language learning and language use. By focusing on languages within the East Asian contexts and among...
A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive senior project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Student must be in last semester of Senior year to take the class.  
This course introduces its students to the theories, principles and techniques underlying qualitative research and its application in applied linguistic research.  Students apply the data collection and analysis tools and conduct their own qualitative projects during the semester. We begin by exploring the epistemology of qualitative research. The focus is on principles in designing a qualitative...
Introduction to fundamental concepts, principles and problems of psychometric measurement relevant to FL/L2 learning. Types of tests and their uses, test construction, analysis and interpretation of results.
Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
The course investigates ways in which humanities engage in the global creative economy. It examines key concepts such as creativity, aesthetics, and contemporaneity in humanities, and examines how they become inseparable to the rise of the global creative economy, whether through culture industries, digital media, creative spaces, artistic activisms, or urban development. It focuses on the...
Beginning conversation, grammar, reading and writing in modern Japanese.
Beginning conversation, grammar, reading and writing in modern Japanese. Students not in a University of Arizona Japanese class the previous semester must take a placement test.
Intermediate conversation, grammar, reading and writing in modern Japanese. Students not in a University of Arizona Japanese class the previous semester must take a placement exam.
Intermediate conversation, grammar, reading and writing in modern Japanese. Students not in a University of Arizona Japanese class the previous semester must take a placement exam.
Introduction to texts, images and activities, both historical and contemporary, that comprise Japanese religion.
This course will explore contemporary Japanese society by investigating its colorful, dynamic, and rich output of visual culture. More specifically, we will look at manga, cinematic anime, and items of material culture, illustrating how these examples of popular art teach us about the various aspects of life in Japan.
The study of the evolution of Japanese social values, aesthetic expression, religion and political institutions in order to understand Japan's cultural heritage and contemporary society.
Sounds, words, grammar, change, writing, variation, and use of the Japanese language; provides basis for further study in the field.
Experiences of Japanese men and women in the second world war as portrayed in short stories, novels, and poetry written in Japan since the end of the war. All readings done in English translation.
Introduction to general issues of gender and language use, specific gender-related differences in the Japanese language, and gender roles in Japan.   (Graduate-level requirements include a substantial term paper and may include extra readings and an additional weekly meeting.)
Phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics, and sociolinguistics of the Japanese language. (Graduate-level requirements include a substantial term paper and a class presentation based on that paper.)
Advanced readings in Japanese and English on specific topics in Japanese linguistics.
Advanced conversation, grammar, reading and writing in modern Japanese.
Advanced conversation, grammar, reading and writing in modern Japanese.
Reading and discussion in Japanese of a variety of advanced-level materials, including newspaper articles, short stories, and poetry.
Reading and discussion in Japanese of a variety of advanced-level materials, including newspaper articles, short stories, and poetry.
This course provides an introduction to the phonetics and phonology of Japanese. Some related topics in morphology are also covered. Students develop a sophisticated understanding of some of the problems encountered by non-native speakers learning Japanese. (Graduate-level requirements include a substantial term paper and a class presentation based on that paper.)
This course explores Japanese society employing anthropological methods.  Topics include politics, social structure, gender, sociolinguistics, education, religion, and popular culture.  The main theme of this course is to learn how to distinguish between images and realities.
This course focuses on the work of Haruki Murakami (1949-), the most popular and widely read novelist working in Japan today, and a major literary figure worldwide. We will read a substantial amount of Murakami's writings, all in English translation, beginning with his short stories, and covering his major novels. We will explore the major themes of Murakami's writings and develop a...
Introduction to Japanese sociolinguistics: questionnaire studies, variation analysis, ethnography of communication, conversation analysis,  interactional sociolinguistics, and language and social interaction.
Survey of modern Japanese literature with readings in English translation: Meiji to World War Two.
Survey of modern Japanese literature with readings in English translation: Postwar and Contemporary Literature.
Selective survey of the history of religions in Japan from the 11th century through the 16th. Topics covered may include the medieval worldview; apocalyptic thought and related practices; Pure Land Buddhism; Zen; and proselytization and religious competition in medieval Japan.  Graduate-level requirements include oral presentations and longer, more in-depth papers.
A selective survey of the history of Japanese religion from the 16th century through the present. Topics may include Shinto and Buddhism; Christianity and its suppression; Edo-period official and popular religion; State Shinto; and Japan's "new religions" and "new new religions."  Graduate-level requirements include oral presentations and longer, more in-depth paper.
This seminar explores topics related to pre-modern and modern Japanese literature. Topics vary by year and participants conduct in-depth discussion, reading and research related to the topic.
This seminar explores topics related to pre-modern and modern Japanese literature. Topics vary by year and participants conduct in-depth discussion, reading and research related to the topic.
Advanced readings in Japanese and English on specific topics in Japanese linguistics.  Graduate-level requirements include a substantial term paper and a class presentation based on that paper.
This course explores Japanese society employing anthropological methods.  Topics include politics, social structure, gender, sociolinguistics, education, religion, and popular culture.  The main theme of this course is to learn how to distinguish between images and realities.  Graduate-level requirements include fulfilling the assignments in the syllabus and writing longer papers.  Graduate...
This course involves the development and exchange of scholarly information on specific topics in the field of linguistics. Course rotates between various topics and may be taken up to four times. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).